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Pages: Innovation and education

As many artists, engineers, and inventors know, behind every breakthrough innovation is a long list of trials and errors—and it’s this very process of invention, reimagnination, and discovery that makes the MIT community come alive. You bring the ideas, we’ll provide the support, space, and funding to make them happen.

Entrepreneurship @ MIT

UP TO $25,000 IN SEED FUNDING
We believe in asking students to think big—with no prior experience required. As part of our commitment to innovation, every interested MIT student can request between $1,000 and $25,000 from the Sandbox Innovation Fund Program to explore taking a project from idea to impact. The program helps jump-start student ideas, provides dedicated mentoring from within MIT and committed partners, and delivers tailored educational experiences.

MIT Sandbox is accessible to all students—and we make it easy for you to get funding. A one-page proposal gets you $1,000 in seed money. The program grows with you and your idea, offering total funding up to $25,000 (to those who progress to the highest levels) and provides connections to the broader MIT entrepreneurial ecosystem including the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship.

learn more: sandbox.mit.edu

Global @ MIT

FULLY-FUNDED GLOBAL EXPERIENCES
The MIT International Science and Technology Initiatives (MISTI) is our pioneering international education program. MISTI matches students with tailored international learning experiences related to their course of study. Programs are designed to provide real-life work experience in leading companies and labs around the world.

MISTI offers internships, Global Teaching Labs, Global Startup Labs, and more. They partner with hundreds of the world’s leading companies, universities and research institutions, so you are sure to find an opportunity that is right for you. MISTI program managers will work closely with you to find a host and project aligned with your skills and interests.

Before you go, you will attend MISTI Prep and Training sessions designed to help you make the most of your experience abroad. Visit MISTI’s program pages for complete information as preparation and language requirements vary. While abroad, you’ll learn first-hand what it’s like to experience cultural differences and complete a project in an international work environment. Upon return, you’ll attend a MISTI re-entry session to reflect on and share what you’ve learned.

And the best part—MISTI covers airfare and living expenses for all its students.

learn more: misti.mit.edu

Research @ MIT

UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH IS THE NORM

At MIT, every student—freshman or senior, scientist or humanist—has the chance to work on cutting-edge projects through the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP).Ninety percent of undergraduates participate in the UROP program (usually for pay, sometimes for academic credit), and more than half take part in four or more. “UROPing” follows a basic rule of thumb: if you want one, you can find one.

You will work shoulder to shoulder with world-class faculty, research staff, and graduate students to solve problems that no one has ever solved before.

learn more: mit.edu/urop

Making @ MIT

SPACES + TOOLS + SKILLS + COMMUNITY
MIT has over 40 design/build/maker spaces on campus. In an effort to foster maker communities, we developed the MakerLodge program. Through MakerLodge, students are trained on introductory technology, including 3D printers, laser cutters, micro/nano making and glass working—to name just a few. Each first-year student that passes the tier 1 training receives $50 in Makerbucks and can access spaces across campus to work on projects with friends. (Download the Mobius app to navigate the spaces and resources on campus.)

Makerspaces at MIT are usually one of three types. They all have similar tools, but their community elements differ and are purposed in a different ways. Machine shops specialize in training/mentoring/making and tend to focus on the creation of complex systems or fine-detailed components, while project makerspaces primarily support class projects. For access to unrestricted making, you’ll want to check out one of the community makerspaces.

learn more: mit-makersystem and makerlodge-community-lodges