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COVID-19

Learn more about how MIT Admissions is responding to COVID-19 in this blog post from our Dean and new dedicated FAQs.

Explore MIT on your own

You don’t have to travel to Cambridge to get a feel for MIT. Since folks at the Institute are always making, writing, and discovering new things—whether on campus or off—there’s more than enough to explore from home. Consider this your starting point as you get to know MIT.

Let’s get started

At the bottom of each page—starting with this one—you’ll find a link to the next stop in this virtual-MIT-choose-your-own-adventure experience. While we recommend reading through each page at least once, we hope you click any link and watch any video that piques your interest. (And if several clicks later you find that you’ve fallen down your own rabbit hole deep into the digital MIT universe…we consider that a success.)

We’ve written pretty extensively about each of these topics elsewhere on our site, and you’ll find those pages linked in the headers. When in doubt, check the blogs; out of nearly 6,000 posts, there’s likely one that covers whatever you’re curious about.

Up first? Academics.


Academics

MIT’s academic program is as much about developing new ideas and solving problems as it is about mastering course material. As our motto “mind and hand”01 the official motto is actually Latin, “mens et manus” suggests, our learning philosophy is rooted in marrying knowledge with action—whether designing, building, and presenting new products from scratch or conducting professional-level research through MIT’s extensive undergraduate research programs. MIT invites students to act upon their knowledge to solve problems that transform society for the better.

Student perspectives

MIT International Science & Technology Initiatives (MISTI): Virginia A. ’18 shares her global internship experience at Tencent in Shenzhen, China.

Meet MIT faculty (Tea with Teachers)

Ever wondered what MIT professors are like? Here’s your chance to get to know MIT Professor Eric Lander, who—among many other things—is known for being the father of the Human Genome Project. For more than 20 years, Professor Lander has taught introductory biology to MIT students!

Undergraduate research

One of the earliest programs of its kind in the U.S., the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) supports thousands of projects each year. By the time students graduate from MIT, 91% them have conducted research02 and most do three or four projects —for pay or for credit—during their undergraduate years through UROP.

Maker education

We were serious about the mens et manus thing. With more than 130,000 square feet of makerspaces—and more on the way)—MIT supports any student interested making, whether novice or expert. For more information about makerspaces and hands-on education at MIT, visit Project Manus.

Take an MIT class for free

Enroll in one of MIT’s free, self-paced courses offered through MITx, from Nuclear Energy: Science, Systems and Society and Circuits & Electronics I, to Mastering Quantum Mechanics and Entrepreneurship 101.


Next stop: student life at MIT

  1. the official motto is actually Latin, “mens et manus” back to text
  2. and most do three or four projects back to text