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COVID-19

Learn more about how MIT Admissions is responding to COVID-19 in this blog post from our Dean and new dedicated FAQs.

MIT staff blogger Matt McGann '00

And then Trogdor smote the Kerrek by Matt McGann '00

I almost forgot: for you regular action folks, the deadline to contact your interviewer is tomorrow (December 1). Check out my post from about this time for early action for things you might want to be doing right now, and also my post about interviewing.

You may be interested to know that there are four different states your interview can take on the E-3 (admissions summary) card:

  • I: We have your Interview in your admissions folder. This is when we are happiest. The interviews are very helpful to us.
  • W: Because you live somewhere where we don’t have any ECs (Educational Counselors, MIT alumni/ae who do the interviewing), we Waived your interview. When we see this, we know not to be too bummed when there’s no interview in your folder. We understand that geography can be hard, so we’ll focus super-hard on all the other pieces of your application. No worries.
  • C: You had an interview and told us so (via the online tracking system or an email/phone call), but we don’t have an interview report in your folder. When we see this code, that your interview was Conducted, we know that you had an interview, which we’re happy about, and we get in touch with your interviewer to send us an extra (first?) copy of your interview report. We understand that you have no control over this — again, no worries.
  • N or [blank]: You did Not do an interview. Yes, you may have read that 9% of these students who choose not to interview are admitted, compared with 22% who choose to have an interview. The reason for this is a bit murky: Are those that choose to interview more interested in MIT and better matches for MIT, making them more likely to be admitted? Or do we actively prefer those students who have interviews? Or is it that the interviews are very helpful pieces to your admissions case? Well, it’s probably a bit of all three. But the numbers all point in one direction: you should choose to have an interview.

For those of you who had interviews, how did they go?

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