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The MIT education: Undergraduate research

One of the earliest programs of its kind in the United States, the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) supports thousands of projects each year with 91% of MIT graduating seniors conducting research, for pay or for credit, during their undergraduate years.

In 1969, Margaret MacVicar, then a 26-year-old MIT professor (and alumna), established UROP with funding from the inventor Edwin Land. Since then, MIT has spent well over $100 million on the UROP program—redefining the nature of research at MIT. Hundreds of academic papers published each year draw on UROP research, and most undergraduates will be included as coauthors on them.

Every scientist was once a novice: UROP gives you a point of entry to begin work that can last a lifetime.

Hands-on research

Through UROP you can perform hands-on research projects with faculty mentorship. The projects span every stage of the process of academic inquiry, beginning with the drafting of a plan, continuing through the process of conducting research, and often resulting in coauthored papers, conference presentations, and even the occasional invention—and you can take part for pay or credit.

How to UROP

You may apply for advertised UROP positions or propose your own. Or conduct your research at MIT, off campus, or even internationally. You may undertake an UROP at any time01 Although, informally, we'd advise you that maybe get your feet under you first. First-year UROPs are often possible but only sometimes prudent. during your MIT career.

 

 

 

  1. Although, informally, we'd advise you that maybe get your feet under you first. First-year UROPs are often possible but only sometimes prudent. back to text